MLA Style One Page Report Sample

From webpage: http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html#General
Modern Language Association (MLA) Format

 

Paper Format

Your essay should be typed, double-spaced on standard-sized paper (8.5 X 11 inches) with margins of 1 inch on all sides. Unless requested, a title page is unnecessary. Instead, you should provide a double-spaced entry in the top left corner of the first page that lists your name, your instructor's name, the course, and the date. Create a header that numbers all pages consecutively in the upper right-hand corner, one-half inch from the top and flush with the right margin. (Note: Your instructor may ask that you omit the number on your first page. Always follow your instructor's guidelines.) Then center your title on the line below the header with your name, and begin your essay immediately below the title. For example:

 

Purdue 1

Pete Purdue

Dr. B. Boilermaker

English 101

12 November 2000

Building a Dream: Reasons to Expand Ross-Aide Stadium

       During the 2000 football season, the Purdue Boilermakers won the Big

Ten Conference Title,earned their first trip to the Rose Bowl in thirty-four

years, and played consistently to sold-out crowds. Looking ahead...

 

Other formatting rules:

Double-space the entire report

Type each item in the heading on a separate line

Type the day, month, and year in the heading in that order without commas.

Indent paragraphs .5 inches.

Use a 12 pt common font (nothing fancy)

 

Your Works Cited List

The works cited list should appear at the end of your essay. It provides the information necessary for a reader to locate and be able to read any sources you cite in the essay. Each source you cite in the essay must appear in your works-cited list; likewise, each entry in the works-cited list must be cited in your text. Preparing your works cited list using MLA style is covered in chapter six of the MLA Style Manual, and chapter four of the Handbook for Writing Research Papers. Here are some guidelines for preparing your works cited list.

List Format

Basic Rules for Citations

For more about formatting your works cited page, visit MLA List of Works Cited (from Research and Documentation Online), view a Sample Works Cited Page (from A Research Guide for Students), or visit some of the links in our additional resources section.

Basic Forms for Electronic Sources

The MLA Style Manual provides extensive examples of electronic source citations in chapter six; The MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers provides extensive examples covering a wide variety of potential sources in chapter four. If your particular case is not covered here, use the basic forms to determine the correct format, consult the MLA Handbook, visit the links in our additional resources section, talk to your instructor, or call the Writing Lab (765-494-3723) for help.

If no author is given for a web page or electronic source, start with and alphabetize by the title of the piece and use a shortened version of the title for parenthetical citations.

A web site

Author(s). Name of Page. Date of Posting/Revision. Name of institution/organization 

    affiliated with the site.  Date of Access <electronic address>.

It is necessary to list your date of access because web postings are often updated, and information available at one date may no longer be available later. Be sure to include the complete address for the site. Also, note the use of angled brackets around the electronic address; MLA requires them for clarity.

Web site examples
Felluga, Dino. Undergraduate Guide to Literary Theory. 17 Dec. 1999. Purdue University.  

	15 Nov. 2000 <http://omni.cc.purdue.edu%7Efelluga/theory2.html>.
Purdue Online Writing Lab. 2003. Purdue University. 10 Feb. 2003.
	
	<http://owl.english.purdue.edu>.

An article on a web site

It is necessary to list your date of access because web postings are often updated, and information available at one date may no longer be available later. Be sure to include the complete address for the site. Also, note the use of angled brackets around the electronic address; MLA requires them for clarity.

Author(s)."Article Title." Name of web site. Date of posting/revision. Name of  

   institution/organization affiliated with site. Date of access <electronic address>.
Article on a web site
Poland, Dave. "The Hot Button." Roughcut. 26 Oct. 1998.  Turner Network Television.  

   28 Oct. 1998 <http://www.roughcut.com>.
"Using Modern Language Association (MLA) Format." Purdue Online Writing Lab. 2003. Purdue University.

	6 Feb. 2003. <http://owl.english.purdue.edu>. 

An article in an online journal or magazine

Author(s). "Title of Article." Title of Journal Volume. Issue

   (Year): Pages/Paragraphs. Date of Access <electronic address>.

Some electronic journals and magazines provide paragraph or page numbers; include them if available. This format is also appropriate to online magazines; as with a print version, you should provide a complete publication date rather than volume and issue number.

Online journal article
Wheelis, Mark. "Investigating Disease Outbreaks Under a Protocol to the Biological

    and Toxin Weapons Convention." Emerging Infectious Diseases 6.6 (2000):

    33 pars. 5 Dec. 2000 <http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/eid/vol6no6/wheelis.htm>.

For more information go to:

http://owl.english.purdue.edu/handouts/research/r_mla.html#Handling